The Key Change

Though the final chorus key change has been a staple of classic pop since records began – and a favourite trick of Eurovision hopefuls – it may surprise you to learn that the majority of winning songs tend not to use it.  In fact, only one of the last seven winners made the decision to […]

Though the final chorus key change has been a staple of classic pop since records began – and a favourite trick of Eurovision hopefuls – it may surprise you to learn that the majority of winning songs tend not to use it.  In fact, only one of the last seven winners made the decision to change key.

Compare that with the losers. 70% of losing entries in the last decade resorted to hitching the final chorus up a bit to give it one last shot at glory – ultimately sealing their fate.

The worst offender?  Nathalie Sorce of Belgium 2000.

Where most people would choose to go up a semitone or a tone (ie one or two notes on the scale), Nathalie decided boost the song up three full tones. Known in musical circles as Diabolus in musica (“The Devil In Music”) the often-side stepped tritone is widely regarded as one of the most abhorrent things you can do with a piece of music.

There’s no denying the effect it had either as the gospel monstrosity scored just two points.

What bearing does geographical positioning have on the outcome…?

Fancy Another?

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